OBJECT MEMORY LOSS  150706

OBJECT MEMORY LOSS  150706

HUYGHE: (...) I could not say “we” anymore. “We” would be too pretentious. When I look at something, I ask myself more and more, Who speaks? When I know who is speaking, I see that there is a commitment. I need to know there is some commitment. I need to find an author. “I” can also be polyphonic, fictional, inhabited by a multitude of characters, be right or wrong or at fault or corrupted. But that’s more “the self” than “me, me, me.” It’s problematic. There are times to say “we.”

 

OBJECT MEMORY LOSS T.01

In our moments of megalomaniacal reverie, we tend to see our memory as a kind of history book: we have won and lost battles, discovered empires and abandoned them. At the very least we are the characters of an epic novel (“Quel roman que ma vie!” said Napoleon). A more modest and perhaps more fruitful approach might be to consider the fragments of memory in terms of geography.

Chris Marker, liner notes 'Immemory' CD-Rom (1997)

 


-     Britney, before you go, there's something I want you to have.
-     Oh, it's beautiful, but wait a minute, isn't this...?
-     Yeah, yes it is.
-     But I thought I dropped it into the ocean!
-     Well baby, I went down and got it for you.
-     Oooh, you shouldn't have.


                                                                                                                  Britney Spears, '...Oops I did it again' (2000)